Archaeologists May Have Found the Tomb of Alexander The Great
Wed, April 21, 2021

Archaeologists May Have Found the Tomb of Alexander The Great

 

The life of Alexander the Great is one of the most controversial in Greek history, so much so that even after his death, he remains relevant. Many historians have claimed that the king died of typhoid, malaria, alcohol poisoning, or was assassinated. However, Dr. Katherine Hall of the New Zealand’s University of Otago believes that he died due to an infection of Campylobacter pylo, a common bacterium of Alexander’s era.

The infection had become more fatal because Alexander was also suffering from Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), an auto-immune disorder that caused him to exhibit symptoms such as abdominal pain and progressive paralysis that eventually left him unable to move. Still, he remained entirely mentally fit despite these symptoms. “I have worked for five years in critical care medicine and have seen probably about 10 cases [of GBS]. The combination of ascending paralysis with normal mental ability is very rare and I have only seen it with GBS,” Hall said. 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

But, many centuries after the king died, archaeologists still haven’t found his tomb. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, modern historians largely agree that the ancient king was buried in Alexandria, Egypt. His tomb became a place of worship. However, his body vanished when Roman emperor Theodosius banned pagan worship in 392 A.D. 

Many archaeologists have attempted to search for the king’s tomb to no avail. Two competing theories by Dr. Andrew Michael Chugg, author of “The Lost Tomb of Alexander the Great,” and archaeologist Liana Souvaltzi, may have come closer than ever before.

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

Souvaltzi believes that Alexander’s wish to be buried in the temple of the Egyptian god Amun Ran was granted. In 1989, Egyptian authorities allowed Souvaltzi to excavate the Oasis of Siwa, where they found lion statues, an entranceway, and a 5,651-square-foot Hellenistic royal tomb. She believes that the carvings and inscriptions were written by Alexander’s famous companion Ptolemy.

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

Meanwhile, Chugg’s theory is quite different. In his book, he explains that Alexander’s original tomb-turned-temple near Memphis in Egypt at the Serapeum complex was built by pharaoh Nectanbo II, which was guarded by sculptures of Greek poets and philosophers - an obvious choice for containing Alexander’s tomb. 

This theory was supported when a piece of masonry was discovered in the foundations of St. Mark’s in Venice, Italy, which entirely matched the dimensions of Nectanbo II’s sarcophagus in the British Museum. Chugg believes that Alexander’s body was stolen from Alexandria by Venetian merchants who mistook it for Saint Mark’s.

 

SIMIALR POST