Researchers May Find the Missing Tomb of Pharaoh Thutmose II Through a 3,500-Year-Old Stone Box
Mon, April 19, 2021

Researchers May Find the Missing Tomb of Pharaoh Thutmose II Through a 3,500-Year-Old Stone Box

 

In March 2019, archaeologists accidentally discovered a 3,500-year-old stone chest at the Deir el-Bahari site. But, this is no ordinary wooden box because it might lead to the grave where Pharaoh Thutmose II was buried. 

 

Credits: Live Science

 

Thutmose II was the fourth pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Egypt, which started in 1493 BC and ended in 1479 BC. To secure his kingship, he had to marry his half-sibling, Hatshepsut, who later become one of the most powerful queens in Egyptian history. Previous historical reports showed that he successfully put down rebellions in Nubia and the Levant and defeated a group of nomadic Bedouins during his reign. However, it was said that the events weren’t ordered by Thutmose II but by the king’s generals. 

 

Credits: Live Science

 

Many experts have believed that Hatshepsut was the real power behind the throne during Thutmose II’s reign. While his mummified body was found with a cache of other royal mummies at Deir el-Bahari, his individual tomb was never found. But, the newly-found stone chest is believed to have ties to the pharaoh. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, the stone chest contained a sacrificial goose, a mummified goose egg, and a wooden box that held what is believed to have been an ibis egg.

 

Credits: Live Science

 

These objects suggest that the pharaoh’s individual tomb must be nearby. The wooden box was also encased in four layers of linen canvas, which was inscribed with Thutmose II’s name. “The royal deposit proves the fact that either a temple was established in the king’s name or the king’s tomb. Since we are in the center of the royal cemetery, it is definitely a tomb. Finding this deposit indicates that we are in the process of discovering the tomb,” Andrzej Niwiński, an expert from the University of Warsaw’s Institute of Archaeology, said. 

 

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