How This Company is Turning Plastic Bottles Into Roads
Sat, April 10, 2021

How This Company is Turning Plastic Bottles Into Roads

 

Many people are trying to contribute to fighting plastic pollution, from recycling plastics to buying only reusable items. Engineer Toby McCartney from Scotland is one of them. He established the company MacRebur, which uses plastic waste for road construction. One of his inspirations for building this company was his daughter, who was concerned about the large amounts of plastics in the oceans. McCartney didn’t want her to grow up in a world where the world’s oceans are tainted by plastic waste. 

 

Credits: BoredPanda

 

McCartney was also inspired by Indian locals, who are melting plastic waste to fill potholes on their roads. “Their job is to gather potentially reusable items and sell them to be turned from rubbish into something useful again. Some of the waste plastics retrieved by the pickers were put into potholes, diesel poured all over them, and the rubbish set alight until the plastics melted into the craters to form a makeshift plastic pothole filler,” the company’s website said. 

 

Credits: BoredPanda

 

McCartney claims that the roads they produce are 60% stronger than traditional roads and may last up to three times longer than regular ones. “We went through about five to six hundred different designs of different polymers that we were mixing in before we found one that actually worked. At the end of the day, plastic is a great product,” he said. 

 

Credits: BoredPanda

 

According to BoredPanda, a Lithuanian website that publishes articles about "lightweight and inoffensive topics,” the company uses 60% of commercial use plastic and 40% household plastic. They use a granulator to turn it into small pieces of no more than 5mm and mixed with an activator to make the plastic bind properly into the roads. They also make sure to use proper temperatures to avoid microplastics leaking out and polluting nature. MacRebur stated that the plastics melt at temperatures lower than 180°C, which is around 120°C. 

 

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