Quokkas And Their Photogenic Smiles
Sat, April 10, 2021

Quokkas And Their Photogenic Smiles

 

Australian quokkas are often referred to as the happiest animals in the world, which is not surprising because they always seem to be grinning. Unlike other wild animals, they also seem to be comfortable around humans and even join visitors in selfies. 

A quokka is a cat-sized marsupial that mostly lives in Rottnest Island, just off the coast of Perth in Western Australia. The island is a protected nature reserve with a small population of full-time residents. These species are the only member of the genus Setonix brachyurus, which is a small macropod. Some types of macropods include kangaroos and wallabies.

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

But, just like other species, quokkas are considered “vulnerable to endangerment” due to agricultural development and expanded housing on the mainland. These have reduced the place the quokkas relied on for protection from predators such as foxes, wild dogs, and dingoes. Reports show that quokkas on the mainland reduced in number by more than 50% by 1992. As of now, there are only 7,500 to 15,000 of this species that exist in the world. 

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

Thus, people who will be trying to visit and interact with them should be extra careful. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, humans are not allowed to handle the quokkas, nor feed them any people food. This is because some food, especially bread-like substances, can easily stick between their teeth and eventually cause an infection.

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

Also, there has been an increased interest in protecting the quokkas. They become popular, especially in the online world, because of their fuzzy squirrel-like appearance, photogenic smiles, and their curiosity. Australia has implemented laws that would protect them. It is prohibited to keep them as pets or take them out of the country. 

 

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