72 Skeletons and Mummies Spotted in Ancient Guanche Cave Tomb
Thu, April 22, 2021

72 Skeletons and Mummies Spotted in Ancient Guanche Cave Tomb

 

In 2017, the first genome-wide data from the Guanches, the white-skinned and fair-haired aboriginal people of the Canary Islands, confirmed that they are indeed the original inhabitants of the Canary Islands and likely originated in North Africa. Through technological advancements, researchers can now shed light on the beliefs and practices of these ancient and fascinating people. 

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

Using drones, a group of archaeologists was able to discover the remains of 72 people from the pre-Hispanic Guanche civilization in a cave that dates back to between 800 and 1000 A.D. The remains consist of 62 adult skeletons and 10 newborns, providing researchers with unprecedented insight into Guanche culture. 

“There are many burial caves in Gran Canaria, but not many like this one. The discovery of the newborn remains is important as they were not included in previous findings until very recently. We know how they can be found in these types of cave burials,” archaeologist Veronica Alberto said. 

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

The archaeologists discovered that Guanches lived in caves and huts and have a primitive knowledge of farming. Just like Egyptians, they embalmed and mummified members of the community with high social esteem. Meanwhile, those in lower classes were simply buried in the ground. “We can confirm that all the pre-Hispanic people in the Canary Islands were prepared the same way for the burial ceremony,” Alberto explained.

 

Credits: All That’s Interesting

 

According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, the team also found traditional burial shrouds made of vegetable fibers and animal skin aside from ancient human remains. “We were flying a drone and we took some pictures of the cave.  It is in a very difficult place to access and you need to climb a cliff to reach the site. People thought the photos were fake because of all the bones there!” archaeologist Ayose Himar Gonzalez said. 
 

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