This Religious Sect Believes That You Have to Cut Off Your Genitals to Get to Heaven
Thu, April 22, 2021

This Religious Sect Believes That You Have to Cut Off Your Genitals to Get to Heaven

 

Many religious sects are notorious for hanging on to every word of the Christian Gospel. For instance, most Christian Orthodox sects refuse to eat meat, drink, swear, and have sex because they claim the gospel prohibits them from doing so. Self-castration was also widely believed in. It’s a well-documented practice in Christianity’s long, complicated history. Self-castration was popularized as a ritual practice by Tsarist Russia’s Skoptsy sect.

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

It was reported that the passage that gave birth to Skoptsy sect came from the first book of the New Testament and one of the bible’s three synoptic gospels, the Gospel of Matthew. It reads: “There are castrates who were castrated by others and there are castrates who castrated themselves for the Kingdom of God.” Skoptsy founder Kondraty Selivanov along with its members believe that they could escape the sin of lust through self-castration, allowing them to live forever. 

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, men who chose the “lesser seal” would have their scrotums and testes removed, while those who opted for the “great seal” would have all their genitals removed, including their penis. In one medical study, it was described as: “the operator seized the parts to be removed with one hand and struck them off with the other.” Meanwhile, women would have their breasts cut off and their genitalia mutilated.

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

While this practice was extremely bizarre, the Skoptsy movement gained millions of followers across Russia. It was reported that the sector coerced children and prisoners to join them. For years, Selivanov continued to return stronger after many exiles. In one book, the author wrote that Selivanov returned as an “authoritative mystic, having converted dozens of people to his faith.” Even after his death in isolation in 1832, the sect only grew and grew because of its ability to unite the isolated masses.

During the 1930s, the Russian government deemed the Skoptsy as “un-Soviet” and ordered many arrests. This dwindled their numbers to between 1,000 and 2,000. It is now believed that the sect is mostly extinct.

SIMIALR POST