Hachikō: The Story of the World’s Most Loyal Dog
Wed, April 14, 2021

Hachikō: The Story of the World’s Most Loyal Dog

 

The story of loyalty and faithfulness of Hachikō, a purebred Akita, continues to resonate with people across the globe even decades since he died. His story became uch an important symbol in Japan that people donated to make him a bronze statue. While the original statue was melted down along with other statues all over the country during the war, his story remained in the hearts of the Japanese. They decided to build a new statue in 1948 in the same spot where it was originally placed.

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

Every day, millions of passengers pass through the Shibuya Station where Hachikō stands proud. A similar statue was also built in 2004 in front of the Akita Dog Museum. In 2015, the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Tokyo, where his master taught, built another brass statue for him. The statue depicted Hachikō jumping up to greet his master after a long workday. It was unveiled on the 80th anniversary of Hachikō’s death.

The story of Hachikō starts with Professor Hidesaburō Ueno, who taught in the agriculture department at Tokyo Imperial University, adopting him in 1924. Every day, the two followed the same routine: Ueno would walk to the Shibuya Station with Hachikō in the morning and take the train to work. The professor would take the train back after his classes, where the Akita dog would be waiting for him to accompany him on the walk home.

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

Unfortunately, the routine stopped when Ueno died after suffering a sudden brain hemorrhage in May 1925. Since then, Hachikō could be seen waiting for his master every day, hoping that Ueno would be there to meet him. He never gave up. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, the dog was eventually noticed by commuters and station employees. They would bring him treats and sometimes sit and keep him company. 

 

 

Credits: All That's Interesting

 

The story of Hachikō only circulated across Japan when Hirokichi Saito, one of Professor Ueno’s former students who also happened to be an expert on the Akita breed, published several articles detailing his loyalty. The dog quickly found nationwide fame. Many people started visiting Hachikō who had become a symbol of loyalty and a good-luck charm. On March 8, 1935, the Akita dog was found dead in the streets of Shibuya due to filaria infection and terminal cancer. 

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