Instagram Fraud Continues As Influencers Dominate the Platform 
Tue, April 20, 2021

Instagram Fraud Continues As Influencers Dominate the Platform 

Instagram has already begun cracking down on likes and comments suspected to be received from third-party apps outside of Instagram / Photo Credit :Oleksii Hrecheniuk via 123RF 

 

Influencers continue to be the main crowd on Instagram and it’s consistently chipping away at Instagram’s efforts to cut down on fraud and misleading stats, perpetuated by many on the platform desperate to cash in on the blowing up influencer economy. 

According to a report by marketing, technology, and design news website Digital Information World, it seems the efforts of Instagram to cut back on fraud have not been especially effective. Recent data from Instascreener, an analytical company looking into the frauds found that not only are these fake numbers on the rise, shows they were also mostly stemming from fake influencer accounts. 

Instagram is trying its best to combat these fraudulent records, and Digiday has recorded that Instagram has already begun cracking down on likes and comments suspected to be received from third-party apps outside of Instagram. 

So far, after taking out these false metrics, the engagement in these wannabe Instagram influencer accounts went down by 1.7% to 1%, but come September and December, they jumped back on 1% to almost 1.2%. 

Making sure the numbers are accurate is important if brand marketers are to stay on the platform. Instagram has already positioned itself at the very heart of the influencer marketing industry and that is why so many brands expect Instagram to be above all these fraudulent activities still proliferating on the website. 

Instagram popularity, measured through the amount of attention an influencer gets, is what makes brands consider working with influencers. If they are to continue on with this, a thorough sweep is crucial. 

Sean Spielberg, co-founder of Instascreener, said that the only way for Instagram to truly combat these problems is to have a preemptive solution, instead of putting out the fires as they come up. 

And they’re going to have to make sure that it’s a problem that may be resolved quickly, especially considering the fact that companies have spent over $1.9 billion in influencer marketing just in 2019.