Influencer Marketing Trends This 2020
Thu, April 22, 2021

Influencer Marketing Trends This 2020

Influencer marketing is here to stay in 2020 as more people realize that its potential is through the roof / Photo by: Pxfuel

 

Influencer marketing is here to stay in 2020 as more people realize that its potential is through the roof. Though there are details that truly need to be ironed out, influencer marketing is becoming a veritable resource for brands and companies looking to reach more consumers. 

At the start of the New Year, here are some possible trends that will define this specific brand of marketing. 

 

Instagram Will Remain as the Main Influencer Platform 

Ask anyone who’s been exposed to any kind of influencer marketing and you’ll learn that influencers are nearly ubiquitous with Instagram, where their content usually has free reign. According to business magazine Forbes, the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) found in a study that 34 multinational marketers went on Instagram for influencer marketing.

Following Instagram is Facebook, which attracted 85% of marketers, YouTube with 67%, Snapchat with 44%, and Twitter with 33%.

Influencer Marketing Hub’s findings also matched that of WFA’s, as they revealed that four in five (79%) of brands tap influencers via Instagram, 46% mine Facebook, 36% go on YouTube, Twitter takes 24% of that share, and LinkedIn with 12%. 

The most popular influencer marketing campaigns are usually fashion and beauty-related, as an eMarketer report found that almost every major fashion and beauty brand was collaborating with influencers and that only 12% were not. 

According to business magazine Forbes, the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) found in a study that 34 multinational marketers went on Instagram for influencer marketing / Photo by: Pikrepo

 

The Steady Rise of TikTok

Aside from Instagram, TikTok is another platform quickly reinventing itself to walk down a similarly successful path, revealed Mobile Marketer, a website providing in-depth coverage of impactful news and trends in the world of mobile marketing. 

 TikTok’s appeal lies in its demographic, first of all, and a 500 million-strong active user base. Digital agency CEO of Effective Squad Brian Wulfe told Mobile Marketer that brands would do well to watch out for TikTok.  

There are some differences in reaching audiences on TikTok, primarily that brands must focus on being “more entertaining and fun and less sales-y.” Even at a young age, the new generation has grown accustomed to the online world that they have become savvy with the way it all works. If something comes off as desperate and too obvious that it wanted to sell, they will definitely see through the façade and even rebuff the effort. 

Aside from Instagram, TikTok is another platform quickly reinventing itself to walk down a similarly successful path, revealed Mobile Marketer / Photo by: Aaron Yoo via Flickr

 

Metrics, Metrics, Metrics

Since influencer marketing is breaking out and becoming legitimate enough to get bigger brands talking about it, marketers will be expecting more tangible results. This is why, in another report by Forbes, the prediction is that 2020 will see more marketers looking for “real ROI.” That means all those “swipe up” options have to really yield something. Marketing is about selling things effectively, and for 2020, brands will be expecting influencers to keep that goal in mind. 

Digestible and Authentic Content 

To put the growth of the influencer marketing industry in perspective, business news website Business Insider predicted that the industry will be worth around $15 billion by 2022, a big growth from 2019’s $8 billion. 

To foster this, influencer content should continue its spirit of authenticity. This trend is not necessarily a trend as much as it is a pattern. Because of this, Forbes predicted that the influencer landscape would probably see more micro and nano-influencers getting more brand deals as the demand for authenticity is better catered to by nano-influencers. These accounts, usually with only 10,000 followers, are considered “niche” with their small reach. But in some ways, smaller influencers and their tight-knit fan bases have a higher level of trust with each other. 

Brands will then need to really pursue partnerships with these people, and partnership, in this sense, means that most brands will need to forget about one-off campaigns. Longer-term partnerships are seen to be more beneficial for both parties than any other approach. This partnership will also be helped along if both brand and influencer are in agreement with what the brand stands for, and this intersection will help push that authentic touch. 

Logan Paul, a YouTuber and influencer, sees this trend of authenticity to also extend to the world of the influencers. He said that more and more influencers now are protecting their message in that they probably won’t take on brand money “just because of a big check.” 

Another YouTuber, Erika Costell, said that she believes audiences will also be gravitating toward more “bite-sized” content that “they can quickly consume and share with their friends.” This has also been somewhat of a pattern on social media for the last couple of years, and it’s evident in the way most YouTubers became popular in the first place. 

Before TikTok, Vine was the app that cultivated this short-form video for entertainment, and even though Vine has technically died, influencers and YouTubers now constantly reference it as the app they began using before they became famous, the place where they first started to make a name for themselves with 6-second hilarious sketches and videos.