It Is the Year of the Fashion and Beauty Influencer as More Brands Lean on Creators’ Vision 
Tue, April 20, 2021

It Is the Year of the Fashion and Beauty Influencer as More Brands Lean on Creators’ Vision 

Years before, it would have been unthinkable for brands to rely on people on the internet to do as they will with the brand to a certain extent. Promoting a service or a product meant putting it in the best possible light / Photo by: Daylen via Wikimedia Commons

 

Years before, it would have been unthinkable for brands to rely on people on the internet to do as they will with the brand to a certain extent. Promoting a service or a product meant putting it in the best possible light. That involves a lot of control and direction that should adhere to what the brand wants to stand for. 

Lately, that restriction is loosened, especially now that fashion and beauty brands realized that they could still exercise a modicum of control for their products but that they won’t completely have to: welcome to the era of more fashion and beauty brands passing the baton to influencers. 

From Influencers to Art Directors?  

It doesn’t take that hard to notice that big brand names are using more and more influencers to reach down to the consumer population. Sure, all those “Swipe Up” options on Instagram won’t get everybody buying anything celebs like Kylie Jenner are wearing, but the frequency with which these types of commerce are emerging clues us in that more companies and brands are seeing unlimited potential in the influencer economy and are interested in taking advantage of it. 

What’s not surprising but still impressive is the fact that, due to more and more influencers getting in on the business, they are also growing to be quite successful themselves. 

Before that, let’s look at what an average influencer earns per #Ad post. According to an article by Huffington Post, companies vary their payment from influencer to influencer based on the number of followers they have, but also “if they fit the campaign criteria,” shares influencer marketing consultant Kayley Reed. 

It doesn’t take that hard to notice that big brand names are using more and more influencers to reach down to the consumer population / Photo by: ResDigital18 via Wikimedia Commons

 

According to Reed, even though most people assume that an influencer has to have a buckton of followers, Reed clarifies that this is not the only metric. So long as they follow company guidelines on the campaign, as well as work well with the company, they usually care little for following. In fact, on a more behavioral spectrum, most brands gravitate towards microinfluencers for that more tightly-knit fanbase.

Depending on the agreement between a company and an influencer, the latter can be paid about $1,000, like North Carolina-based influencer, Tomi Obebe. For influencers who incorporate content on other platforms, they usually get paid a little more. Beauty influencer Audree Kate Lopez was once paid $3,500 for a campaign, this is after Lopez had already set the rate and after having worked with the brand as well. 

If they are lucky, or at least, if it is their direction in life, some influencers work very closely with brands that they themselves become recognized as art directors of the brands they previously advertise for. 

That is the case with Athens-based influencer Evangelie Smyrniotaki who, after working as an influencer, eventually made her mark as an art director for campaigns under The Attico, Reformation, Bulgari, and Bergdorf Goodman. 

“I think the artistic approach on Instagram doesn’t always work, you grow a smaller following because people love to watch reality. I believe that my audience is slightly different -- they are quite loyal and have very trained eyes,” she shares in an interview with Yahoo Lifestyle. 

Brand Benefits 

Beauty brands and fashion brands have both had quite the popularity on Instagram. According to Social Bakers, a global AI-powered social media marketing company, “two-thirds of all content from the 100 biggest beauty brands on Instagram mention another user, and that’s half of the content from fashion brands, respectively.” 

Sixty-six percent of posts from beauty brands on Instagram mentioned another user, showing just how collaborative brands and influencers have been in the past few years. Fashion brands' mentions of other users are at 49%, but even that is worth noting. 

What’s more interesting is that it seems all these engagements brought about by collaborating brands and influencers are not limited to big names on the platform, because even the microinfluencers are doing pretty well for themselves. Social Bakers report that about 75% of the mentioned users by brands were actually microinfluencers, or influencers on Instagram with less than 100,000 followers.

Sixty-six percent of posts from beauty brands on Instagram mentioned another user, showing just how collaborative brands and influencers have been in the past few years / Photo by: Santeri Viinamäki via Wikimedia Commons

 

The report states that this reliance of brands on smaller influencers is because “they understand the power influencers have over a niche industry and specific audiences. In fact, influencers that have under 10,000 followers account for the majority of profiles mentioned by the fashion and beauty industry; that’s 37% from fashion and 43% from beauty. This clever strategy is truly working to keep audiences engaged on Instagram, as mentions of other users tend to drive higher engagement.” 

In terms of engagement, beauty brands and fashion brands both had 800 interactions with influencers on the platform, when they are mentioned in a post. For beauty brands, there are only 400 interactions with influencers on posts that did not mention influencers. Meanwhile, fashion brands still had about 600 interactions on posts not mentioning influencers.