Warner Bros. Finally Gives "The Flash" Movie a Release Date
Thu, April 22, 2021

Warner Bros. Finally Gives "The Flash" Movie a Release Date

It was easy for The Flash to make his mark on television, but running over to theaters didn't come as quickly. Ezra Miller first signed to play the role of the Scarlet Speedster in 2014 and the standalone film was supposed to be released four years later / Photo by: BagoGames via Flickr

 

It was easy for The Flash to make his mark on television, but running over to theaters didn't come as quickly. Ezra Miller first signed to play the role of the Scarlet Speedster in 2014 and the standalone film was supposed to be released four years later. A handful of circumstances, however, delayed the release. It's only five years later that Warner Bros. announced a final date to see "The Flash" on the big screen: July 1, 2022. 

 

What Took Them So Long?

After signing with Warner Bros., many would believe that Miller would immediately put on the red suit to begin his role as The Flash. But the movie hasn't started filming and it likely won't until 2021. Seeing that the movie was originally posted for a 2018 release, it seems bizarre that the filming itself has been delayed for so long. Why?

One factor is Miller's prior commitment to the "Harry Potter" spin-off franchise, "Fantastic Beasts." Entertainment news site Screen Rant adds that a stack of problems in production and "a sense of creative indecisiveness" also caused the movie's delay.

After signing with Warner Bros., many would believe that Miller would immediately put on the red suit to begin his role as The Flash. But the movie hasn't started filming and it likely won't until 2021 / Photo by: Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons

 

One of the first writers and directors of the movie was supposed to be Seth Grahame-Smith. It was going swell in 2016, but then Grahame-Smith was pulled off from "The Flash" and another round of problems ensued. Positions for the director and writer have changed in the last few years, constantly pushing back the film's development.

These circumstances led to how making "The Flash" differs from other DC movies that have already come and gone over the years. For instance, Screen Rant says the "Green Lantern Corps" movie is well underway for years now even though the creative team for it is similar to "The Flash."

Even now that the studio has a new set of creatives working on the project, progress is still slow given that Miller is currently working on "Fantastic Beasts 3." There's also not much information on how they'll be presenting the speedster's origin.

Roundabout Problems

Part of the new team that'll be working on "The Flash" is "IT" director Andy Muschietti and "Birds of Prey" screenwriter Christina Hodson. Even with Muschietti's background on horror films, he said his "Flash" film won't be showing such elements.

"An element of horror? I don’t think so. What captivated me about 'The Flash' is the human drama in it. The human feelings and emotions that play in the drama [of it]," the director said, as quoted by the Collider, a website that offers new movie news, movie trailers, and trusted movie reviews. "It’s going to be fun too. I can’t promise that there will be any horror [elements in it], really, but it’s a beautiful human story."

The Scarlet Speedster made his first appearance in the DC movie universe in "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice," and came back in the Zack Snyder/Joss Whedon co-directed "Justice League." However, Snyder leaving the "Justice League" after a family tragedy disrupted the original DC lineup.

Since then, getting Barry Allen his solo movie has been a hell of a marathon. Before Grahame-Smith, Chris Miller and Phil Lord were the first writers to come up with a story treatment in 2015. But they soon departed to take on "Solo: A Star Wars Story" instead.

Rick Famuyiwa took over and only went as far as casting Kiersey Clemons as Flash's love interest, Iris West, before pulling out a few months before the start of filming. The Collider says Famuyiwa's departure was due to creative differences.

It adds that developments turned from complicated to outright bizarre when reports say Miller and comics legend Grant Morrison were teaming up to take on a darker approach for the material. But it doesn't seem that the idea played out as recent news stated "Bumblebee" writer Christina Hodson will be taking over the story treatment for "The Flash."

The Collider says Warner Bros has an extensive list that makes up the "DC Extended Universe," which began with "Man of Steel" followed by "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice," "Suicide Squad," "Wonder Woman," and "Justice League" / Photo by: Coolcaesar via Wikimedia Commons

 

What's Next for DC?

Everything seems to finally fall into place not only for "The Flash" but for other beloved DC characters as well. Warner Bros has restructured its strategy to bring its superheroes on the big screen since the "Justice League" mess (the aftermath of which is still felt as fans call for the release of the so-called "Snyder Cut").

"The Flash" is definitely a priority for the studio as well as the "Green Lantern Corps." Along with these films is building up origin stories of other characters, some of which have already been cleared like the Joker, Wonder Woman, Shazam, and Aquaman.

Batman will also get another solo film starring Robert Pattinson, unlike Superman and Cyborg whose fates still aren't clear.

The Collider says Warner Bros has an extensive list that makes up the "DC Extended Universe," which began with "Man of Steel" followed by "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice," "Suicide Squad," "Wonder Woman," and "Justice League."

These movies will be followed by "Birds of Prey," "Wonder Woman 1984," "The Batman," "The Suicide Squad," "The Flash," and "Aquaman 2"—all of which are slated to hit theaters between 2021 and 2022.

The studio is also planning spinoffs such as the currently untitled "Black Adam" movie, which introduces Shazam's antagonist, and "The Trench," which explores the Trench location with a horror tone.