How To Handle An Aggressive Cat
Mon, April 19, 2021

How To Handle An Aggressive Cat

Cats are known for acting quite strange. Their behavior can seem confusing to people who aren't used to taking care of felines. Sometimes, they can act like sweet, fuzzy kittens. Other times, they can act more like a tiger, ready to attack anything that moves / Photo by: Evdoha_spb via Shutterstock

 

Cats are known for acting quite strange. Their behavior can seem confusing to people who aren't used to taking care of felines. Sometimes, they can act like sweet, fuzzy kittens. Other times, they can act more like a tiger, ready to attack anything that moves.

Whether you’re living with a bunch of cats or you’re living with only one, a cat’s behavior and attitude will change depending on their environment. For example, if you introduce them to a new brother or sister, they might treat them with complete detachment or, worse, they might fight them to win your attention.

However, there might just be a reason why they like to scratch your skin off. Before they completely make a canvas out of your fletch, it is your job as your cat's carer to figure out why they act the way they do. The following are a few possible reasons.

Cats are natural fighters

Not all cats love to fight; some are submissive and actually nice. In order to address the problem of having an aggressive cat, we should understand that some cats like to be dominant. Since cats are related to tigers, pumas, jaguars, and other huge Felidae species who are mostly carnivorous and natural hunters, they tend to show aggressiveness towards strange cats that are new to them.

Your cat’s dominance is a natural instinct. Usually, male cats are the ones who like to pick fights with other cats. According to Catster, a website that provides tips and guides about taking care of felines, cats fight because of hormones and territorial disputes with other cats. This happens when they reach their social maturity between two and four years of age. 

They might display their dominance by urinating in a place they like, rubbing their faces on objects, or making other cats uncomfortable, thus, picking a fight with other cats. In a web post by The Spruce Pets, an online resource that offers practical, real-life tips and training advice to help you care for your pet, they mentioned that cats have the ability to know whether the other cat is weaker before the owner can sense it.

Since cats are related to tigers, pumas, jaguars, and other huge Felidae species who are mostly carnivorous and natural hunters, they tend to show aggressiveness towards strange cats that are new to them / Photo by: DavidTB via Shutterstock

 

Fear and pain

Cats who are suffering and in pain might respond with hisses and swats when their humans or other cats touch their sensitive areas. Each feline has different sensitive areas. Some might like belly rubs, while some might find it uncomfortable to be touched. Aside from that, terrified cats respond with body language such as turning sideways or moving their ears in certain ways.

Settling catfights

Some owners are lucky to have their kittens at a very young age. With younger cats, owners can teach their pets proper behavior-- habits that will last until the cat's adulthood. Those who choose to adopt older cats should know how to tame their cats in a proper way. Here are some tips to stop catfights and teach your cats some positive behaviors.

Spay or neuter - Spaying or neutering is defined as the “surgical removal of a female cat’s ovaries and uterus." This may help your cat be less hormonal, but Catster suggests that if spaying or neutering isn’t working, you could give your pet some pheromone products that will help reduce the tension that your cat might be feeling.

Hand them toys - Giving toys to dominant cats could distract them from bullying your newer cats, but you should make sure that they don't see this as a reward by not tolerating their bad behavior. You could also try playing with both of them and handing them both treats. In that way, they could learn to be comfortable with each other.

Give them an equal amount of love and attention - Once your cat starts to feel that she is being replaced by the new cat, she will start to feel jealous and might start to pick on the new cat. Don't favor one over the other.

Separate them - If your cats can’t come to terms with each other despite doing things that you think might be helpful, it is time to separate them. Enforce a reasonable amount of proximity between your two pets. Have a separate bowl and kitty litter box for each of them.

Enforce discipline - As a pet parent, you shouldn’t tolerate bullying between your cats. Avoid rewarding the bully by giving them too much attention. Giving them attention might help in reducing their jealousy, but this might also tolerate their aggressive behavior. Always balance the way you discipline your pet cats.

Having a grumpy and aggressive cat may be a big problem if not addressed properly, as it may cause chaos in your home. With the right guidance, love, and discipline, your cats will know how to live with the rest of your household peacefully.

Some owners are lucky to have their kittens at a very young age. With younger cats, owners can teach their pets proper behavior-- habits that will last until the cat's adulthood / Photo by: alis yimyen via Shutterstock