What To Do When Your Teen Starts To Rebel
Wed, April 21, 2021

What To Do When Your Teen Starts To Rebel

Not all teenagers can claim that they have engaged in any kind of misbehavior. Some are wild, while others are more reserved. However, parents know that they should still keep an eye on their kids as they grow up / Photo by: hawk_style via Shutterstock

 

Our teenage years can be the happiest and most memorable of our lives. Some people might have neverending stories about how they spent their younger years, these tales filled with risks and danger but, ultimately, fun. However, for parents, this phase of life can seem so frustrating and stressful as they focus on the danger their teens are exposed to and choose to explore.

Not all teenagers can claim that they have engaged in any kind of misbehavior. Some are wild, while others are more reserved. However, parents know that they should still keep an eye on their kids as they grow up. Adults should know from experience that what teenagers need the most is understanding and guidance -- a voice that leads them to own up to their mistakes instead of feel ashamed of them, if they make any mistake at all.

Build a strong connection

No one can master parenthood by reading a book or watching a documentary. However, having a strong connection with your teen can be enough to get you through their teenage years and until your kid grows up as an adult. 

The Character Corner, a website that provides resources and information about parental relationships, mentioned in their article that a healthy relationship starts when parents try to get to know their children. Adults must learn how to share their life and this includes allowing their children to share their thoughts, dreams, passions, and values with them. 

Teenagers engaging in risky behavior usually claim that they act out or misbehave because they believe that their parents don't care about them. They might also say that their dangerous behavior is caused by not having someone who listens to them, and being with their peers as they commit dangerous things makes them feel less alone. 

It is said that one's teen years should be the time of their life, stretching their moral muscles. This is the time when they learn what it looks like to have a life of character and conviction. Teens will learn how to balance their life and relationships when they have a role model to look up to -- that's when parents come in.

No one can master parenthood by reading a book or watching a documentary. However, having a strong connection with your teen can be enough to get you through their teenage years and until your kid grows up as an adult / Photo by: Africa Studio via Shutterstock

 

Dealing with teen anger

Teenagers might exhibit angry behavior through aggressiveness or violence. This is quite common for teenager boys because they can engage in brawls. Help Guide, a nonprofit mental health and wellness website, mentioned that this kind of behavior can make parents feel threatened by their own child. A teenager’s anger can lead to something worse if not managed easily. 

Anger can be a challenging and scary emotion. But it should be understood that this is just the surface of something deeper. Their anger is just a mask that hides their frustration, embarrassment, sadness, fear, or vulnerability. Their violence is their way of coping with the heavy feelings they cannot show in public. For example, many boys have difficulty recognizing their feelings and expressing them. Teenage boys are also the least expected to ask for help whenever they need it.

On the other hand, most teenage girls are emotional. They are so full of emotions that they find it hard to contain it. The challenge for parents is to help their teens cope with these emotions in a more constructive and healthy way, instead of letting their feelings cloud their judgment.

Look at different perspectives

Even though we've all experienced our own teenage problems and survived to tell the tale, there is no guarantee that we will understand our own children’s predicaments during the same stage of their life. We've all lived our lives in very different ways. Times change, and parents might no longer know the extent of their children's struggles.

Verywell Family, a modern resource that offers a realistic and friendly approach to pregnancy and parenting, stated that looking at a teen's struggles from their perspective is what most therapists do to engage with their clients. This technique is called reframing, and this shift of perspective will let parents have a clear focus on and understanding of their teen’s behavior.

Both parents and teens can benefit from taking on fresh perspectives. When teens notice that their parents start to act differently towards their unwanted behavior, they might start to act differently, too. There is no harm in putting your feet in their shoes; it's a very helpful way to understand their issues without being too intrusive.

Teenagers might exhibit angry behavior through aggressiveness or violence. This is quite common for teenager boys because they can engage in brawls / Photo by: Tom Tom via Shutterstock

 

Take care of yourself

Having a teenager can be stressful, especially if they start acting out and misbehaving. Of course, no parent wants to leave their child alone as they go through what could possibly be the hardest phase of their life. However, your health is important too. Always take some time to relax and practice self-care.

Learn how to de-stress when things start to get overwhelming. Single parents definitely have it harder, but any parent should not be afraid to find support from their friends, families, and anyone else who can help them manage their relationship with their teen.