Should You Encourage Your Teen To Have A Job?
Sun, April 18, 2021

Should You Encourage Your Teen To Have A Job?

The first summer job or after-school job can be unforgettable for some people especially since these part-time jobs provide additional cash that can help them get through college or to buy something they’ve wanted for / Photo by: ArtWell via Shutterstock

 

A lot of older people believe that teenagers today have all the convenience that they never had before. Some even think that the younger generation is too entitled for their own good and that they are being provided with all the things they want without working hard for them. This is why some parents are encouraging their teenagers to get a job in order for them to have an understanding of the value of hard work. 

In an article published by Motherly, a website that provides expert ideas and mom-to-mom inspiration to women exactly when they need it, it was mentioned that in the 1970s and 80s, most teens worked during their summer vacation, according to the results of a recent survey done by the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan American think tank based in Washington, D.C. that provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world. However, other studies showed that the number of older kids who work in summer jobs has decreased since the early 1990s.

 

Why Part-Time Jobs for Teens Have Decreased

The first summer job or after-school job can be unforgettable for some people especially since these part-time jobs provide additional cash that can help them get through college or to buy something they’ve wanted for some time such as a car of their own. However, teens are now less likely to work part-time due to their hectic schedule in school, stated CNBC, a media company that provides real-time financial market news and information to its investor audience.

Lauren Bauer, a co-author of a study by the Hamilton Project and Bookings Institutions, said, “High school has become more intense; we have increasing demands on what it is that high schoolers need to be doing and how much that takes.” The amount of homework and course requirements has also increased, especially if students are near graduation. 

Aside from this, it’s also true that job market changes, education, and college resume-building priorities have an effect on teens deciding to get a part-time job or not. Bloomberg, an international news agency headquartered in New York, explained further that the shift in the job market has made it more difficult for older kids to have a part-time job. Teen labor rates have also fallen dramatically over the decades. Employers have become less willing to hire teens because there is more competition with the older population who are still in the workforce and new Americans who are moving to the country looking for work.

 

Learning Budgeting and Money Management

Having a job at an early age can help teenagers learn valuable lessons in handling finances that they can rely on even when they get older. They can gain knowledge about how taxes work and why they are needed, for instance. Teen Job Prep, an organization that is focused on empowering teens, mentioned that teens who get a part-time job will see how their money gets into their bank account. This will help them realize that money is something that they should not take for granted as it can quickly disappear if they are not careful in handling it. 

Together, parents and children who get a summer job can set up financial goals such as college funds, a new car, and even tickets to a concert. Some portion of their salary should be set aside to go into a savings account that can serve as a contingency fund. Parents can help nurture their child’s sound financial habits that will be essential for the rest of their lives. 

Having an afterschool job can also be instrumental in keeping teens away from bad influences / Photo by: Africa Studio via Shutterstock

 

Away From Bad Influences

Having an afterschool job can also be instrumental in keeping teens away from bad influences. Verywell Family, an online portal that provides articles about parenting, mentioned that if teens head straight from school to a job, it shortens the amount of their free time that otherwise, might be used to engage in risky and even illegal activities. 

On the other hand, an article by Consumer Affairs, an organization that provides expert resources and verified reviews, revealed that teens who worked more than 20 hours a week were more likely to be less engaged in school. It cited the result of a study that said academic performance is affected when students get a job and that they are also prone to behavioral problems such as stealing, carrying a weapon, and substance use. 

Kathryn C. Monahan, a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of Washington, said, “Although working during high school is unlikely to turn law-abiding teenagers into felons or cause students to flunk out of school, the extent of the adverse effects we found is not trivial, and even a small decline in school engagement or increase in problem behavior might be of concern to many parents.”

 

A Great Addition to College Application and Work Resume

College entrance tests are stressful enough, and getting through the application process is frustrating too, which is why it will be helpful to have a fund ready for entering college. The admission office might consider the applicant’s resume especially if they notice that the student has had a work experience that may be regarded as a sign of grit and determination. 

Teens who get summer jobs or after-school jobs will also have an idea of how it feels to be a member of the workforce. They will learn the value of interpersonal skills as they get along with co-workers who may be irritating. Worse, they might even get a demanding boss. Whatever their experience on the job, this will surely add to their maturity, with the proper support of their parents of course. 

Teens who get summer jobs or after-school jobs will also have an idea of how it feels to be a member of the workforce / Photo by: iJeab via Shutterstock