An Update on Disney World’s Galaxy’s Edge Theme Park 
Thu, April 22, 2021

An Update on Disney World’s Galaxy’s Edge Theme Park 

Galaxy’s Edge already feels like the closest we could get to our collective nerd fantasy of finally being able to pretend like we’re in George Lucas’ most famous creation / Photo by: CrispyCream27 via Wikimedia Commons

 

It’s been almost three months since Galaxy’s Edge, Disney World’s newest Star Wars theme park, was opened to the public. With entire menus filled with Star Wars-themed food, crates and spaceships to sell the idea of life in a galaxy far, far away, and even a lightsaber-making attraction, Galaxy’s Edge already feels like the closest we could get to our collective nerd fantasy of finally being able to pretend like we’re in George Lucas’ most famous creation. 

But a significant amount of time has already passed since its release. How has the Galaxy’s Edge been doing these past few weeks? 

Nuked Galaxy’s Edge Parts? 

You’d think with such a worldwide fanbase that the Galaxy’s Edge would continue operations without so much as a snag in its plans. With the way it’s been talked about on social media by avid fans, that certainly seems to be the case, but a closer inspection reveals that there are still problems in paradise. 

According to Screen Rant, an online entertainment news website launched in 2003, certain parts of the theme park have disappeared probably from the significantly lower turnout upon launching. It’s true that there are a lot of Star Wars fans in the world, but not all of them can experience the Galaxy’s Edge, either from lack of funds or time. 

Additionally, there was a little bit of wise planning on the end of the consumers, which was explained by Disney CEO Bob Iger. It is believed that many of those who wanted to go intended to wait out the audience that usually comes in bulk at the opening of something as big as the Galaxy’s Edge so that they can join in the fray when the crowd has died down. 

Except everyone had that exact same idea. 

It wasn’t entirely a ghost town. A lot of people showed up and took pictures as they are wont to do. 

However, attractions like the Wishing Tree, for example, an in-canon addition in the theme park in line with it being ostensibly set in Batuu, has lost its many ribbons and strings. The Wishing Tree is an important part of the theme as a whole, and since Galaxy’s Edge is set in Batuu, a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe, the Wishing Tree is part of the culture of Batuu, and it is a tree which you tie a piece of string to and make a wish. As per Batuu belief, “once the ribbon disintegrates, that means the wish has come true.” 

But all of those ribbons are gone now. And even the promised Bounty Hunter who was supposed to come up to people at the cantina to talk to them about the damage on the Millennium Falcon is nowhere to be found. 

New Attractions 

Be that as it may, a lot of things might still need fixing for the Galaxy’s Edge but for Disney, the path is only ever forward. According to Orlando Weekly, a newsweekly publication in the Greater Orlando area of Florida, Disney is still determined to make more Star Wars-themed places despite the many problems of Galaxy’s Edge. 

The new ride, which will be called “Rise of Resistance,” is now something that Disney is looking forward to as the push that they need to keep the entire line of Star Wars-theme attractions from running into the ground. 

The ride will reportedly use “groundbreaking technology and impressive, larger-than-life sets to become one of the most technologically advanced attractions ever built. It’s pitched as the next step in an evolution of theme park rides, which for the last twenty years has mostly been focused on the impressive line-up of indoor rides at Universal Orlando.” 

Be that as it may, a lot of things might still need fixing for the Galaxy’s Edge but for Disney, the path is only ever forward / Photo by: Tomás Del Coro via Wikimedia Commons

 

Consistent Childlike Wonder 

All this preoccupation with numbers and performances sure do affect the fate of these attractions more than anything else, but it is also worth noting that those who have been to Galaxy’s Edge have enjoyed it nonetheless. 

Take Adam Rogers of Wired.com, a monthly American magazine publishing print and online editions; for him, Galaxy’s Edge had meant a lot. It was 14 acres of amazing canon material laid out for interaction. 

Rogers even recalls the odd interplay of incredulity and excitement in going to Galaxy’s Edge, the rationality of an adult knowing that this is all pretend but the innocence shining in the eyes of the child inside that still wants to embrace it all and suspend disbelief altogether. 

Rogers writes: 

“I'm a fan, so I reach for the lever in, I'll admit it, a transport of delight. It's metal, a little cold, takes some real force to pull back. It feels perfect. I mean, this is exactly what it feels like to pilot the Millennium Falcon…. But, like, that’s not what I mean. What I mean is, how could pulling that lever feel so perfect? How could it feel like anything? There’s no such thing as hyperspace. There’s not even any such thing as a Millennium Falcon.” 

All this preoccupation with numbers and performances sure do affect the fate of these attractions more than anything else, but it is also worth noting that those who have been to Galaxy’s Edge have enjoyed it nonetheless / Photo by: Elisfkc via Wikimedia Commons