The Weirdest (but Still Fun) Video Games to Ever Exist
Fri, December 3, 2021

The Weirdest (but Still Fun) Video Games to Ever Exist

The history of video games is rich and colorful thanks to innovation and the boundless imagination that game makers have. In every era, game developers and creators have had to deal with different things / Photo by: Blake Patterson via Wikimedia Commons

 

The history of video games is rich and colorful thanks to innovation and the boundless imagination that game makers have. In every era, game developers and creators have had to deal with different things. These days, it's the intense competitiveness of the market, a different problem than the '80s game makers had, which was to push the boundaries on game-making while also working with very limited graphics. 

In some cases, creativity is let loose and ascribes to no standard. These games may appear simple and have no rhyme or reason at all, but are actually pretty refreshing. In the past decades, we’ve seen weird games come and go; here we take a look back at them.

"Zombie Nation"

Let’s jump right in on this weirdness train with Zombie Nation, a game which tasks you to be the “disembodied ghost head of a samurai named Namakubi.” With his ghost head, you will then go around American cities Mario style, fending off enemies, destroying buildings by shooting “eyeballs and vomit.” Even the gameplay looks weird, although the format probably allows for the barf to look more tolerable than it might normally be. 

According to Mashable, a global, multi-platform media and entertainment company, it just embraces the weirdness as it offers a glorious ending with a finally worthy opponent for Namakubi’s severed head: the evil Statue of Liberty. 

"Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker"

Say severed heads are not your cup of tea? Then maybe you should try “Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker,” which is exactly what you might think it is. Released by Sega Genesis, the game was supposedly made by Sega to “show off its graphics capabilities in an inexplicable company-funded launch title.” It’s easy to get into it as it is very highly-amusing. Plus, “Smooth Criminal” plays in the background a lot and you get to do two kinds of awesome things: save kids and have a great power move where all the bad guys dance “Smooth Criminal” with you. 

Say severed heads are not your cup of tea? Then maybe you should try “Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker,” which is exactly what you might think it is / Photo by: Malcolm Jackson via Flickr

 

"Harvester" 

This is probably a weird jump from a fun romp with Michael Jackson’s game to a more dreadful kind of experience, but alas, here we are. If weird horror is more your thing, try “Harvester,” a truly weird game flirting with a plethora of psychological triggers. Simply put: if you get triggered easily, do not engage. 

If not, well, you’re in for a truly weird treat. According to PC Gamer, bringing news about the world of computer gaming, the game has players traverse possibly “the most messed up small town ever.” At some point, you burn down a woman’s dinner in a puzzle and lead her to commit suicide with her daughter. All in all, it’s just a surreal and gory experience. 

"LSD"

And what about just living in a weird world tasked with weird goals? Because let’s be honest, in this list, this is where we’re headed. You can try “LSD: Dream Emulator,” a game described by website Showbiz Cheat Sheet as an “old PlayStation game” that allows users “to walk around a dreamworld inspired by the dreams of Hiroko Nishikawa, who worked in the studio.” 

It’s a game that would now be defined as pretty trippy and strange, provided that you’re ready for that. 

"The Zoo Race"

Imagine jumping onto another game that also doesn’t seem to want to take itself seriously. “The Zoo Race” is probably just the perfect head-scratcher to quench your interest in what it means to probably make a game out of the high experience. “The Zoo Race,” which is a game that centers on the animals left after the Great Flood, subscribes to the weirdness and truly commits to it, down to the very plot of the game.

It sees two characters, Reuben and Hannah, arguing about the validity of the Noah’s Ark story and eventually getting forced into the Noah’s Ark story after becoming animals and ending up in an animal race. The game centers on the leftover animals after the Great Flood, and Noah and his sons somehow interested in watching animals battle head to head with each other to win a race, complete with a gauntlet of obstacles. How do Hannah and Reuben fit in all this? Well, after their debate, they both turn into animals and become part of The Zoo Race. 

“The Zoo Race,” which is a game that centers on the animals left after the Great Flood, subscribes to the weirdness and truly commits to it, down to the very plot of the game / Photo by: Web Gallery of Art via Wikimedia Commons

 

"The Stanley Parable" 

Cheat Sheet is right when they say that the best way to describe “The Stanley Parable” is “just to make someone play it.” It really doesn’t get more ominous than that. It leans heavily on the narrator, too, as most games like it do. 

Over on Steam and Reddit, there are plenty of discussions around the ending of the game and what it meant, although the consensus focuses more on how it made other gamers feel -- whether it was reasonable or, like many users assume, completely contradicts the game. It’s good that the story--being in narrative format--does have a lot of endings though, so then people can explore what ending they got and discuss with others.