How Parents Can Encourage Their Kids to Do Better In School
Wed, April 14, 2021

How Parents Can Encourage Their Kids to Do Better In School

Teachers are responsible for children at school, but parents act as their primary influencers. Hence, parents do play a role in ensuring that their kids “get the most out of their education” / Photo by: Evgeny Atamanenko via 123RF

 

Schoolteachers are oftentimes burdened with taking care of a child’s learning and development, according to the staff of Study International, an educational platform. Teachers are responsible for children at school, but parents act as their primary influencers. Hence, parents do play a role in ensuring that their kids “get the most out of their education.” 

Teacher Adam Hatch wrote an open letter on the educator platform BoredTeachers saying that parents are the original teachers of students. He added that their attitudes towards school, learning, and education “are going to rub off on your kids.” Hatch encouraged parents to “get it together” because teachers need their help. 

Understandably, parenting is one of the most significant and challenging roles an adult can undertake, said Ester Cole of the Psychology Foundation of Canada, via Canada’s public broadcaster CBC. It’s difficult to motivate your child to do better in school, but don’t lose hope! 

Foster School-Home Partnership

Parents often have questions related to school rules, grades, homework, behavior codes, and the curriculum. The communication process between you and your child’s teachers “is likely to provide valuable information” about their education. To Cole, the process helps increase this important partnership on behalf of your child. You may need to be reminded that you can and should communicate with the school in order to have your inquiries answered. 

Communicating with the school enables you to share information that will help teachers in understanding your child. In Cole’s perspective, “one-way communication from the school is less impactful” than a two-way communication pattern. 

Parents and teachers need to work as a team instead of accusing the latter when something goes wrong. Hatch wrote, “If we give your student a bad grade, don’t accuse us of being bullies – that is meant to inform you that your student needs to make some changes.” A teacher can only cater to a child’s needs during school hours. Therefore, what happens at home is beyond their control. 

Teachers are blamed for being unable to manage a difficult child or a child who bullies their classmates in school. However, the root cause of the problem lies at home. For Hatch, you are expected to model good behavior. “Parents who are engaged, concerned and aware create students who are also engaged, interested, and attentive,” she added. This way, you can help teachers by instructing your child on how to behave properly in school and form good habits. 

Be More Involved In Your Child’s Learning

You can’t always rely on your little one’s teachers considering they have to split their time between yours and other students. You can monitor your child’s homework or get them extra tutoring. You can also enroll them in special classes during the summer to get them up to speed. However, it’s important to avoid helicopter parenting so your child can learn from their own mistakes. 

National PTA of national public media initiative Reading Rockets explained, “Remember, it’s your children’s homework, not yours. Create a specific homework space that’s clutter-free and quiet.” It is not advisable to “carry the whole load,” as recommended by the University of Delaware, a public research university. Don’t write your child’s essay or do their project for fear that a school requirement is too difficult for them to do. 

Instead, encourage your child to edit and double-check his work, but don’t forget to allow them to make mistakes because this is the only way for teachers to gauge if they really understand the material. It’s also how children learn to take responsibility for the quality of their work. Know when to intervene or to take a step back to allow your child to foster their independent learning skills. 

You can’t always rely on your little one’s teachers considering they have to split their time between yours and other students. You can monitor your child’s homework or get them extra tutoring / Photo by: dolgachov via 123RF

 

Show Your Support 

Some kids do poorly in school because “they see themselves as unworthy.” If you want your child to feel good about learning, they must first feel good about themselves. Motivate your child by commending them on their efforts. On the other hand, it’s normal to encounter a difficult assignment. Listen carefully and encourage your child to break it down into small steps. 

Teach Kindness

Adam Grant and Allison Sweet Grant of American magazine The Atlantic said that if you survey American parents on what they want for their children, more than 90% admit that one of their priorities is that their kids should be caring individuals. That’s understandable considering that being kind and caring are held as moral values in every society and major religion. 

But when you ask kids what their parents want for them, 81% report that their parents value achievement and happiness over being a caring person. You can push your children to be successful, but it’s also important to nurture kindness. 

It’s okay to be proud of their accomplishments, but kindness doesn’t sacrifice any of those things. The real test of parenting is not centered on their accomplishments, but “who they and how they treat others.” Don’t badger your child into kindness. Instead, show them how being kind and caring is showed and valued. 

Parents can inspire children to do better in school by talking to their teachers or encouraging them to do their assignments independently. Academics are important but encouraging them to be kind and caring is helping your child learn to be a better individual inside and outside of school.

Parents can inspire children to do better in school by talking to their teachers or encouraging them to do their assignments independently / Photo by: Anurak Ponapatimet via 123RF