The Best of Netflix’s Original Series According to Critic and Audience Scores
Wed, April 21, 2021

The Best of Netflix’s Original Series According to Critic and Audience Scores

Audiences and critics agree that Netflix has had many successful series this year and will probably continue to have them until the next year. / Photo by: Bernardo Ramonfaur via 123rf

 

Netflix is having quite a year with their impressive line-up of original creations. Audiences and critics agree that Netflix has had many successful series this year and will probably continue to have them until the next year. In this list, we explore the most successful ones so far. 

“Master of None”

Critic Score: 100% 
Audience Score: 90%

Description: “Dating, career, finding a great taco -- it’s all hard. But becoming a mature adult is a whole other degree of difficulty.” 

When we’re children, all we want to do is grow up, but as we do, we realize that adult life is not all it’s cracked up to be. According to the entertainment news website Cheat Sheet, “Master of None” has already garnered such critical acclaim that it had already won an Emmy shortly after it aired in 2015.

The story is about Aziz Ansari’s character Dev Shah, a “not-so-famous actor living in New York, who is simply trying to get by.” It sounds simple that way but shows a different side of Ansari, as he plays a different version of himself here, becoming more “loud, ridiculous, and goofy.” 

“Big Mouth”

Critic Score: 100%
Audience Score: 79%

Description: "Teenage friends find their lives upended by the wonders and horrors of puberty in this edgy comedy from real-life pals Nick Kroll and Andrew Goldberg."

This divisive little comedy piece may appear downright dirty--at some point, a main character starts hallucinating the male genitalia out of his own masculine insecurity--but it’s not completely the goal of the story. Yes, the episodes are chock full of shocking and crude humor, but it is also incredibly honest in its portrayal of the “relatable exploration of adolescence and physical maturation,” as described by technology news website Digital Trends. Puberty is not a pretty and fun stage in life, and this show encapsulates that very well in this wonderfully free animated series. 

“The Order” 

Critic Score: 100%
Audience Score: 73%

Description: "Out to avenge his mother's death, a college student pledges a secret order and lands in a war between werewolves and practitioners of dark magic."

Over at The Verge, the show is described as a brilliant mix of horror and dark humor, a kind of subgenre now that is slowly cropping up as more horror filmmakers push the boundaries on what is known as horror. The trailer did appear to be duping viewers, though, as the show is largely more humorous when watched. 

The Verge explains that the story picks up fast, throwing the viewers into the deep end as early as the second episode and the third where “the show transitions into a flat-out hilarious mashup of college and horror comedy.” 

“Tuca & Bertie” 

Critic Score: 100%
Audience Score: 70%

Description: "Free-spirited toucan Tuca and self-doubting song thrush Bertie are best friends — and birds — who guide each other through life's ups and downs."

This show is so good that even though it was canceled, the love for it is still apparent in the number of people who keep hoping that it gets renewed for a second season. Those who have seen it may compare the art style to that of BoJack Horseman, another Netflix original series, and that’s just because one of the main animators in BoJack was the one who created “Tuca & Bertie,” the tale of two bird friends in the city and their day-to-day struggles. 

Each episode is filled with heartwarming comedy and relatable girl problems. It also tackles the portrayal of anxiety and trauma in the best way. 

“Alias Grace” 

Critic Score: 99%
Audience Score: 87%

Description: "In 19th-century Canada, a psychiatrist weighs whether a murderess should be pardoned due to insanity. Based on Margaret Atwood's award-winning novel."

Between “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Alias Grace,” Margaret Atwood seems to be having a great year with her creations. “Alias Grace,” in particular, rose to become critically-acclaimed because, as Sarah Polley said when she adopted the story into a series, she was pretty much on the same page as the author herself, Margaret Atwood. 

“My main objective was to track a woman’s journey through a man’s world where she’s endlessly harassed, abused – and expected to remain silent,” Polley tells the Rolling Stones, and for the climate of Hollywood right now, such storytelling is key to understanding the plight of women when they are perceived as public property, i.e., when they are expected to do things out of a need to please the public. In the barrage of men being found out to actually be scumbags -- not surprising -- such a story finds an audience pretty quickly. 

 

Sarah Polley's main objective on "Alias Grace" was to track a woman’s journey through a man’s world where she’s endlessly harassed, abused – and expected to remain silent. / Photo by: kamion via 123rf

 

“Dear White People”

Critics Score: 99%
Audience Score: 63%

Description: "Students of color navigate the daily slights and slippery politics of life at an Ivy League college that's not nearly as 'post-racial' as it thinks."

According to Digital Trends, the success of the show is not only hinged on the talent of the actors in it, but also because of director Justin Simien’s handling of the complex “nuances of identity, romance, education, and socialization” while also keeping the story balanced with “plenty of comedic moments,” which makes it informative without being judgmental.