"BoJack Horseman" Season 6 Episodes Review: The Road to Recovery and the Perfect Shoe-Drop First Half
Thu, April 22, 2021

"BoJack Horseman" Season 6 Episodes Review: The Road to Recovery and the Perfect Shoe-Drop First Half

“BoJack Horseman” is back and it’s unsurprisingly more positive than ever. It sees the protagonist and titular character BoJack Horseman going through a much-needed transformation / Photo by: lee leblanc via Flickr

 

“BoJack Horseman” is back and it’s unsurprisingly more positive than ever. It sees the protagonist and titular character BoJack Horseman going through a much-needed transformation, Diane and Princess Carolyn going through theirs with confused reluctance, and Todd and Mr. Peanutbutter’s own meaty side stories made meatier by their underlying mystery. 

There’s a lot to unpack in Season 6 and right off the bat, the first half already provides fans with at least enough information that this may seem like it’s going on a lighter note compared to everything the creators and writers and animators have put out so far but turns around in the last minute in typical BoJack Horseman fashion. 

 

Episode One: “A Horse Walks into Rehab” 

Tapping into that sitcom structure that the series constantly builds up on, uses, and then occasionally tears down, “A Horse Walks into Rehab” is exactly the kind of episode it says it is. 

On this road to recovery, we see BoJack finally coming to terms with the fact that understanding you have a problem doesn’t fix the problem. The opening episode is a strong start, as film industry and review website IndieWire credits the strength of the storyline to one other additional character, Jameson, a young girl in rehab in almost the same situation as Sarah Lynn had been before. Even before the sixth season kicked off, this reminder of Sarah Lynn’s death keeps BoJack centered and helps him actually go through rehab. 

 

Episode Two: “The New Client”

The series is also as much about BoJack as it is about the other characters in the show who have impacted his life. One character with the biggest impact on BoJack’s life, aside from the ever-looming presence of his mother, is his agent and former lover Princess Carolyn.

In this episode, her entire struggle as a mother is depicted beautifully and rather heartbreakingly, as she tries to continue on with living in the very demanding standards of Hollywoo for women who have to be everything all at once and like it. 

Episode Three: “Feel-Good Story”

For such a positive title, episode three is a meditation on capitalism, oddly enough. Diane is also most linked to the discussion of politics in the show, as evidenced by her previous commentary on LGBTQ+ people in the media and feminism; this episode runs along the same vein.

Diane holds herself to the same sky-high standard she holds the rest of the world in and toward the end realizes that it’s not so bad to forgive oneself, especially if it will be beneficial for them. This is all played out in the backdrop of the inevitability of capitalism.

 

Episode Four: “Surprise!”

According to entertainment and culture news website Vulture, the episode may have leaned on the goofier side, having a more “relationship drama and silly farce” structure, but it is a much-needed sigh of relief (ironically) to that feared shoe-drop.

This is what Mr. Peanutbutter is shown in the episode as a still deeply flawed character trying to get by.  

Diane is also most linked to the discussion of politics in the show, as evidenced by her previous commentary on LGBTQ+ people in the media and feminism; this episode runs along the same vein / Photo by: William Murphy via Wikimedia Commons

 

Episode Five: “A Little Uneven, Is All”

By the time we reach the fifth episode, the show comes back to tackling each character’s struggles all at once, although admittedly, the politics that was discussed in the third episode continues in this episode via veering to the matter of class and status in the form of Hollywood assistants striking in the entertainment industry, reports Screen Rant, an online entertainment news website. Those who have followed the show’s tense road to Season 6 will understand that this episode might also be seen as an ode to “BoJack Horseman” employees themselves asking for the chance to unionize. 

 

Episode Six: “The Kidney Stays in the Picture” 

In continuation of the discussion of classes and status in the community, we are also finally given the back story on where Todd, a Caucasian character with a Latinx username, really came from. It’s not as strong an episode as, say, Princess Carolyn’s or the opener of the season, but it does give us the very relatable line of, “Why do you need to be proud of me on your own terms?” which Todd says to his stepfather. Ouch, Todd. 

Although admittedly, the politics that was discussed in the third episode continues in this episode via veering to the matter of class and status in the form of Hollywood assistants striking in the entertainment industry / Photo by: Los Angeles via Wikimedia Commons

 

Episode Seven: “The Face of Depression” 

“The Face of Depression” is another strong episode in that it aligns perfectly with the goals that BoJack wants to achieve. In it, he travels the country and goes through every person he has done something unpleasant toward and, just like his visit with Todd, sits down with them and actually shows interest in their lives. 

Vulture commends the episode too for quite literally giving BoJack a chance to remake himself, pushing this change visually by having him undergo a physical transformation of “trading his dyed-black mane for a shorter, grayer haircut, and swapping his usual jacket for something softer and more collegiate.”

Episode Eight: “A Quick One, While He’s Away”

BoJack is changing, he’s putting in the work. But the thing is, “BoJack Horseman” is about learning and wanting to deal with your problems, not just keeping them at bay or ignoring them. The episode caps off with a cliffhanger that’s surely a devastating start to the second half of the season.