Millennials Rewrite the Standards of Relationships
Sat, April 10, 2021

Millennials Rewrite the Standards of Relationships

Millennials are the generation born from 1980-2000. Branded as Generation Y, Generation Me, Echo Boomers, and Digital Natives, they are confident, are goal-oriented, seek new challenges, and are not scared to question authority / Photo by: ammentorp via 123RF

 

Millennials are the generation born from 1980-2000. Branded as Generation Y, Generation Me, Echo Boomers, and Digital Natives, they are confident, are goal-oriented, seek new challenges, and are not scared to question authority. They are the first generation completely engrossed and absorbed in the world of digital technology which formed their identities and attitudes socially, culturally and politically. Their exceptional traits make them unique from their predecessors. This is perhaps the very reason they are redefining the rules of courtship and marriage.

Understanding Love and Commitment

The most distinct aspect in the millennial world is their apparent endless choices and the potent technology to access these options. Millennials believe that being good to oneself means being a better person in all aspects of life, the very foundation of relationships and commitments. Although finding Mr. Right or Mrs. Right is still significant, the path has become more complicated. Millennials prefer passion over stability, independence over dependence, and multiplicity over exclusivity. They view relationships as an adjunct to personal growth, and as such want passionate rather than stable partners. Since they rely on themselves, stability is unnecessary. Moreover, they perceive that needs change through the course of a lifetime, so falling in love many times is certain. For them, the commitment is conditional.

Sex Recession

The pervasive theory that millennials are not getting enough sex was debunked by a nationwide survey among the 18-34-year-old millennials about their sex life. 68% denied the existence of a sex recession, 71 % were personally satisfied with their sex life, and varying proportions had tried anal sex, BDSM (bondage, discipline, sadism/masochism), group sex, and rough sex. They claim that they are more experimental and not inhibited by taboo and stigma. It is more about quality than the quantity they say. "The Me Too" movement also influenced society’s sexual habits, as women are now more empowered to have the kind of sex they want. Sex satisfaction plays a great part in this.

Moreover, the digital landscape helps in shaping millennials' sex lives, putting them in charge of the kind of sex they want to have. Millennials are actually having better sex than anyone!

The pervasive theory that millennials are not getting enough sex was debunked by a nationwide survey among the 18-34-year-old millennials about their sex life / Photo by: Katarzyna Białasiewicz via 123RF

 

Redefining Marriage

According to the Pew Research Center, millennials are three times more likely to never marry in comparison to their grandparents. They are not compelled to get married for several reasons.

Millennials place an immense value on achieving goals, attaining personal satisfaction and needs, and autonomy. They first strive to get their life to where they can say they have made it. They see marriage as a distraction to their success. This indicates that people tend to get married at a later age and are more likely to move in together first and have kids before committing to marriage.

Millennials have higher expectations of their potential partners in life in areas of compatibility, communication, and intimacy. They look for somebody who can accept them as who they are as well as partners who can fulfill all their desires. This is a tall order and these are unrealistic expectations.

Women no longer need to marry men for financial support or gain. They feel that tying themselves to men in marriage requires of them an immense sacrifice and subordination to their needs. They would rather pursue their studies and establish their careers rather than marry men instantly.

Marriage today is passé. It is too constricting and controlling; it is no longer relatable. The Pew Research Center says a fourth of millennials are likely to never marry. Marriage has lost its enchantment, but is still desired by about 70% of millennials. However, it is out of reach of many who lack the means of a solid economic base.

Spike in Prenups

A marital trend initialized by millennials is the prenups between couples to establish a division of assets and finances in case of a divorce. Associated before only with the rich and famous, it has now become prevalent among everyone, particularly the Millennials.

A marital trend initialized by millennials is the prenups between couples to establish a division of assets and finances in case of a divorce / Photo by: Aleksandr Davydov via 123RF

 

According to a study conducted by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, 62% and 51% of lawyers surveyed saw an upward trend in the request of prenuptial agreements and request for protection, respectively. This is an indication of millennials’ fear of divorce and the reluctance to marry. Many of them are inclined to protect their interests and assets that were built up before marrying, considering the marital experiences of prior generations. Millennials regard prenups as the best choice to guard and deal with separate property holdings, business profit, expected family inheritances, and prospective alimony claims.

Additionally, there are more women becoming the primary breadwinners in marriages with the narrowing of the pay gap from 6.5% in 2011 to 4.6% in 2018. It seems that divorce has embedded itself into the millennial psyche as an extremely possible scenario, which requires ample preparation: the prenup.