Grisly Remains of Roman-Era Human Sacrifice Victims Found in Britain
Tue, April 20, 2021

Grisly Remains of Roman-Era Human Sacrifice Victims Found in Britain

 

The medieval period has been an interesting time for many researchers and scientists. One of the reasons is their standard custom of human sacrifice and ritualistic burial practices. This has been proven by the artifacts and human remains discovered by archeologists.

Last April, Iron Age and Roman-era tools were accidentally discovered by the engineers in Oxfordshire, England. There’s evidence of animal carcasses and household items, including knives, pottery, and a comb. All of these ranged across a variety of historical periods which were thousands of years old. But the highlight of the discovery was the dozens of Neolithic skeletons. 

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they saw on the news or read in history books, reported that the engineers found 26 human remains at the site. One of them had their skull placed by their feet while another had her feet cut off and her arms tied behind her back. These suggest that they were likely victims of ritualistic human sacrifice. In an interview, Paolo Guarino, project officer at Cotswold Archaeology said, “These findings open a unique window into the lives and deaths of communities we often know only for their monumental buildings, such as hillforts or the Uffington White Horse.”

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

“The results from the analysis of the artifacts, animal bones, the human skeletons, and the soil samples will help us add some important information to the history of the communities that occupied these lands so many years ago,” he added. 

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

The archaeologists believe that the human remains belonged to the same community that helped create a prehistoric sculpture made of chalk called the Uffington White Horse. All of the evidence has been taken in by experts for forensic investigation. Neil Holbrook, Cotswald Archaeology chief executive, stated that the discoveries “provided a glimpse into the beliefs and superstitions of people living in Oxfordshire before the Roman conquest. Evidence elsewhere suggests that burials in pits might have involved human sacrifice.”

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